Signs of the Times (4/1/17)

Muslim Converts Revitalizing Europe’s Fading Christian Churches

Due to Muslim conversions, faith leaders indicate Christianity now is making a comeback in Europe. Many parts of Europe are becoming more secular, and worship houses are losing congregants in noticeable amounts. An increasing number of Muslims, many of them refugees from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, are converting to Christianity in Europe where it is safer to do so. Local experts said the converts are embracing various Christian denominations, including Protestants, evangelical and Catholic. “European churches have struggled for decades to share the Gospel with modern secular Europeans,” Matthew Kaemingk, a professor at the Fuller Theological Seminary in Seattle, told Fox News. “They have found Muslim immigrants to be much more open to the message of Christianity. Europeans are wealthy, comfortable, healthy, and powerful,” Kaemingk said. “In short, they don’t think they need God.” Conversely, he said Muslim immigrants are intensely spiritual and more open to hearing about Christ.

Proportion of Born-Again Christians Dropping

The results of a new national survey by the American Culture & Faith Institute suggest that the numbers of born-again Christians are dwindling. The ACFI study is not based on people who call themselves born-again. Instead, the survey identified born again adults as those who believe they will experience an afterlife in the presence of God only because they have confessed their sins against Him and accepted Jesus Christ as the redeemer who saves them from eternal punishment. The research found that only three out of every ten adults in the US (30%) currently qualify as born-again Christians based on these criteria. That represents a significant drop from nearly half of the adult population meeting the same criteria just two decades ago. Three out of every four born-again adults (76%) believe that the Bible is the inerrant Word of God, and seven out of ten (70%) contend that the Bible is totally accurate in all of the life principles it teaches. However, less than half (46%) read the Bible at least once a week. Most shocking – and puzzling – is the fact that less than half of them believe that the Bible contains and conveys absolute moral truths. These statistics help to explain why only 30% of born-again Christians have a biblical worldview – in spite of the fact that eight out of ten think they do.

New Arizona Abortion Law Strictest in U.S.

Gov. Doug Ducey on Friday signed into law what appears to be the most comprehensive restrictions in the country on what doctors have to do if a baby is born alive during an abortion, reports the Daily Courier. Ducey’s action came less than 48 hours after he got the final version of the bill from the state senate. The law which takes effect this summer expands on existing statutes which say if there is a live birth, it is the duty of any doctors in attendance to see that “all available means and medical skills are used to promote, preserve and maintain the life of such fetus or embryo.” The new law provides the first-ever definition in statute being “delivered alive.” In essence, it says that includes any fetus or embryo, no matter how premature, shows breathing, a heartbeat, umbilical cord pulsation or “definite movement of voluntary muscles.” At that point, medical professionals are required to do everything possible to keep the baby alive. Some doctors testified that it would be cruel to subject a premature or severely deformed baby to extraordinary measures that will not save its life. Instead, they said the practice is to provide comfort to the baby and, if the family wants, give it to the mother to hold. The ability to do that under the new law is limited, they say.

Kentucky Orders Last Abortion Business to Close

The State of Kentucky is engaged in an epic legal showdown with the state’s last remaining abortion facility, EMW Women’s Surgical Center, in an effort to shut it down – possibly as early as Monday, April 3, 2017 – for failing to meet licensing requirements. Gov. Matthew G. Bevin and his administration issued a letter on March 13, 2017, to the EMW Women’s Surgical Center in Louisville, informing them that they were in non-compliance with licensing regulations for failure to have adequate transfer agreements with an ambulance company and a hospital. Bevin successfully shut down EMW’s Lexington abortion office last June for conducting abortions without a license to do so – an order that was later upheld by the State Supreme Court. He also closed an illegally operating Planned Parenthood abortion facility in Louisville that had begun conducting abortions without a license.

  • America’s largest abortion provider, Planned Parenthood, recently opened a new clinic in Washington D.C. which cost $20 million.

Travel Ban Suspension Extended

A federal judge in Hawaii issued an extension on his order blocking President Trump’s travel ban hours after hearing arguments Wednesday. Hawaii contends the travel ban discriminates against Muslims and hurts the state’s tourist-dependent economy. The Trump administration had asked Judge Derrick Watson, a federal judge in Hawaii, to narrow his ruling to cover only the part of the president’s executive order that suspends new visas for people from six Muslim-majority nations. Earlier this month, Watson prevented the federal government from suspending new visas for people from Somalia, Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen and freezing the nation’s refugee program. His ruling came just hours before the federal government planned to start enforcing Trump’s executive order.

Undetectable Laptop Bombs Led to Aircraft Electronics Ban

U.S. intelligence sources suggest ISIS and other terrorist groups can build laptop bombs capable of slipping past airport security scanners. The sources fear that terrorists have gotten their hands on sophisticated airport security equipment that allows them to properly conceal explosives in laptops and other large electronic devices, Fox News reported Friday. That intelligence is behind the recent decision to ban electronics in carry-on bags from flights to the U.S. from 10 airports in eight Muslim-majority countries. The U.S. ban applies to nonstop U.S.-bound flights from 10 international airports in Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Cairo; Istanbul; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, the Associated Press reports. Six passengers were hurt on a plane at an airport in Somalia in March of 2016 when a bomb planted in a laptop exploded. Heightening the concern is intelligence suggesting that terrorists have obtained sophisticated airport security equipment to test how to effectively conceal explosives in laptops and other electronic devices, reports CNN.

U.S. Defense Secretary Mattis says Iran Continues to Sponsor Terrorism

Iran is continuing to behave as an exporter of terrorism and still sponsors militant activity, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis said in London on Friday. Asked about comments Mattis made in 2012 that the three primary threats the United States faced were “Iran, Iran, Iran,” Mattis told reporters that Iran’s behavior had not changed in the years since. “At the time when I spoke about Iran, I was a commander of U.S. central command and Iran was the primary exporter of terrorism. Frankly, it was the primary state sponsor of terrorism and it continues that kind of behavior today,” Mattis said.

Border Wall Funding Hits Roadblock

Republicans in Congress are considering delaying a decision on President Trump’s request for $1.5 billion this year to begin construction on a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Reuters reported Tuesday that some Republicans say that the money needed for the project would likely not be in a spending bill that must pass next month to avoid a government shutdown. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., told Reuters that funding would be considered “at a later time.” Trump’s first budget proposal to Congress asked lawmakers for a $2.6 billion down payment for the wall. An internal report prepared for Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly estimated that a wall along the entire border would cost about $21 billion. Lawmakers have been balking at his plans to sharply cut other federal spending to pay for the wall and other boosts to border security, while also increasing military spending. A group of House Republicans on Thursday introduced the first major bill to fund President Trump’s border wall, saying the government could collect billions of dollars by imposing a 2 percent fee on all the money Mexicans and other immigrants send back home. Estimates vary, but remittances from those in the U.S. to their relatives back home could top $130 billion a year. A 2% tax could net more than $2.5 billion a year.

Trump Issues Executive Orders to Crack Down on Unfair Trade Practices

President Trump signed two executive orders Friday aimed at cracking down on foreign competitors’ unfair trade practices, and pledged that his actions are setting the stage for a “great revival” of American manufacturing. “From now on, those who break the rules will face the consequences,” Mr. Trump said as he signed the documents at the White House. “Under my administration, the theft of American prosperity will end.” The first executive order aims to ensure that duties are fully collected when imposed on foreign importers who cheat. The second order directs Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and the U.S. Trade Representative to compile a report within 90 days to identify a broad range of trade abuses, country by country and product by product.

Treasury Hits North Korea with New Sanctions over Nuclear Program

The Treasury Department slapped sanctions on 11 North Koreans and one company Friday over Pyongyang’s nuclear-weapons program and violations of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The sanctions target North Korean nationals working as agents of the regime in Russia, China, Vietnam, and Cuba to provide financial support or procurement services for weapons of mass destruction, in violation of U.N. resolutions. Under the sanctions, any property or interests in property of the designated persons must be blocked. “Today’s sanctions are aimed at disrupting the networks and methods that the government of North Korea employs to fund its unlawful nuclear, ballistic missile, and proliferation programs,” said Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. He said the sanctions “underscore this administration’s commitment to countering the threat to the United States, to our allies, and to stability on the Korean peninsula and in the wider Asia Pacific region posed by the Kim regime in Pyongyang.”

Senate Passes Bill to Let States Strip Funding from Planned Parenthood

With Vice President Mike Pence casting the tie-breaking vote, the Senate approved a bill Thursday to let states strip federal family planning funds from Planned Parenthood, marking the first successful strike against the country’s largest abortion network. The bill, which already cleared the House and now heads to President Trump, rolls back an Obama-era rule that said states couldn’t deny family planning money to organizations just because they performed abortions. While other clinics may be affected, both sides acknowledged the fight was about Planned Parenthood, which has been a target for Republicans in Washington and in state capitals across the country in recent years. Democrats vowed political retribution, saying women are already anxious over the GOP’s agenda and will see this as an assault on their health care choices.

North Carolina Repeals & Replaces ‘Bathroom Bill” but LGBT Activists Object

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Thursday signed a repeal of the bathroom access law that had spawned a nearly yearlong boycott against the state, but LGBT rights advocates criticized the new measure as being just as discriminatory as the law it replaced. As part of a compromise between the state’s Republican-controlled legislature and its Democratic governor, the General Assembly delivered the repeal, called House Bill 142, to Mr. Cooper’s desk in an expedited effort Thursday. “It’s not a perfect deal, but it repeals House Bill 2 and begins to repair our reputation,” Cooper said Wednesday about the legislation. Meanwhile, the American Civil Liberties Union and gay and transgender activists have complained that the new law still denies them certain protections from discrimination.

U.S. Gives NATO Allies 2 Months to Boost Defense Spending

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned NATO allies Friday to boost defense spending or come up with plans to reach the alliance’s budget guidelines within two months. Tillerson, in his first talks with NATO counterparts in Brussels, said that Washington is spending a “disproportionate share” on defense compared with its 27 partners, and that he expects action by the time President Donald Trump meets with other alliance leaders on May 25. NATO leaders pledged in 2014 to halt defense spending cuts and move toward a guideline target of 2 percent of gross domestic product within a decade. Only four other nations currently meet the target: Britain, Estonia, Greece and Poland. Tillerson did not say what would happen if European allies and Canada fail to respect their pledges. During election campaigning, Trump suggested that he might not come to the defense of those allies who do not do their fair share, rocking allies near an increasingly aggressive Russia, such as Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland.

Trump Allegedly Did Business with Russian Organized Crime

To expand his real estate developments over the years, Donald Trump, his company and partners repeatedly turned to wealthy Russians and oligarchs from former Soviet republics — several allegedly connected to organized crime, according to a USA TODAY review of court cases, government and legal documents and an interview with a former federal prosecutor. The president and his companies have been linked to at least 10 wealthy former Soviet businessmen with alleged ties to criminal organizations or money laundering. Trump’s Russian connections are of heightened interest because of an FBI investigation into possible collusion between Trump’s presidential campaign and Russian operatives to interfere in last fall’s election.

Anti-Abortion Activists Charged with Felonies for Secret Tapes

Two anti-abortion activists who made undercover videos of themselves trying to buy fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood were charged with 15 felonies, California prosecutors announced Tuesday. State Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges against David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt. Becerra said the two used a fictitious bioresearch company to meet with women’s health care providers and covertly record them. Prosecutors said they invaded the privacy of medical providers by filming without consent, reports Fox News. Daleiden and Merritt allegedly filmed 14 people without permission between October 2013 and July 2015 in Los Angeles, San Francisco and El Dorado counties. One felony count was filed for each person and the 15th was for criminal conspiracy to invade privacy. Daleiden called the charges “bogus” and that they were coming from “Planned Parenthood’s political cronies.” Planned Parenthood said in a tweet that the charges send a “clear message… You can’t target women & health care providers without consequences.”

Premature Deaths in Young People Rising

Premature deaths soared in 2015, according to a new report released Wednesday from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. According to the report, the largest affected group were people aged 25-44. The rate among that group soared in 2015, due in large part to a surge of drug overdoses in suburban areas. Drug deaths are also accelerating among 15- to 24-year-olds, but almost three times as many people in this age group died by homicide, suicide or in motor vehicle crashes, according to the new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). A rural and urban divide, along with racial differences, were also evident in the data. Young white adults in rural areas were more likely to die by suicide or overdose, while homicides by firearms were much more common for young black victims.

Economic News

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May officially triggered Article 50, the legislation that begins Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union, on Wednesday. Britain’s notification letter sets off a process in which the EU will respond within 48 hours. Britain will have two years to negotiate the terms of this long-awaited divorce, meaning it will leave the EU by April 2019. The negotiations could be heated. Of particular concern is whether Britain decides to remain in the EU’s single market, the borderless trade area that also allows EU citizens to live and work, without a visa, in any other EU country. The government has pledged that it is prepared to give up this crucial trade access as it tries to lower immigration.

Mexico’s central bank raised interest rates for the fourth time since the U.S. election on Thursday, partly in an attempt to save the Mexican peso, which hit an all-time low on January 20, Trump’s inauguration day. Interest rates were raised by 0.25 percentage point to 6.50%. Trump’s threats — to build a wall, tax Mexican imports and remittances, and withdraw from the free trade agreement NAFTA — caused the peso to lose value throughout the election. Mexico’s central bank governor, Agustin Carstens, said before the election he and other Mexican leaders had a “contingency plan” in place if Trump won, expecting the peso to plunge. He’s kept his word, taking several measures to shore up the currency, including hiking interest rates and selling dollars to international investors. It appears to be working. Since Trump’s inauguration the peso has rallied, up 16% over that time. Its value is almost back to where it was the night before the November 8 election when it plunged in value.

On Friday, SpaceX — run by Tesla CEO Elon Musk — launched a used rocket. It marked the first time in the history of spaceflight that the same rocket has been used on two separate missions to orbit. After successfully launching a satellite toward geosynchronous orbit — 22,000 miles into space — the rocket then returned to Earth and landed on a remotely piloted platform, known as a droneship, in the Atlantic Ocean. It was the company’s sixth successful landing on a seaborne platform. The launch was a huge step for SpaceX. Reusing rockets is essential for companies like SpaceX that want to drive down the cost of space travel.

Israel

Israel’s government approved the first West Bank settlement in two decades Thursday, creating the first serious test for U.S. President Trump’s new foray into Middle East peacemaking. The White House pointedly avoided any specific condemnation of the announcement, although it said that further settlement activity “does not help advance peace” and that it expects Israel to show restraint moving forward. Still, the relatively tepid response was a far cry from the automatic condemnations voiced in the past by the Obama’s administration in reaction to Israeli settlement announcements. The White House statement even went so far as to “welcome” what appears to be a limited Israeli commitment to take Trump’s concerns about settlements into “consideration,” without any guarantees to avoid similar announcements.

Islamic State

An Iraq government statement says Iraqi fighter jets have carried out airstrikes against the Islamic State group outside Mosul, killing more than 100 militants. Saturday’s statement says the strikes hit three ISIS targets in Baaj, a remote northwestern town near the Syrian border, and killed between 150-200 militants. It said the militants had crossed over from Syria, suggesting that ISIS still enjoys free movement across the borders. Airstrikes by Iraqi Air Force and U.S.-led international coalition have been vital to the months-long operation to retake Mosul from ISIS. In January, Iraqi authorities declared eastern Mosul “fully liberated.”

Fighting is still underway to recapture the city’s western side, where the civilian death toll appears to exceed 140 people, reports CNN. “U.S.-backed Iraqi forces battling the Islamic State to liberate Mosul are suffering heavy casualties in the deadliest urban combat since World War II, according to top U.S. commanders for the Middle East. A United States military spokesman said Thursday that Islamic State fighters had been herding local Iraqi residents into buildings in western Mosul, calculating that rising civilian casualties would restrain the United States from using airstrikes to help retake that half of the city. “ISIS is smuggling civilians into buildings so we won’t see them and they’re trying to bait the coalition to attack,” said Col. Joseph E. Scrocca.

ISIS supporters are reportedly on a recruiting blitz in the wake of last week’s deadly terror attacks in London, despite suggestions from British police on Monday that attacker Khalid Masood may not be associated with any terror groups. Hundreds of violent, pro-ISIS videos reportedly have hit the web since Wednesday’s attack. According to the Times of London, Google, the owner of YouTube, has apparently failed to take many of them down. One YouTube video viewed by Fox News on Monday showed a series of brutal executions, and encourages followers to “live the cause.”

Russia/Iran

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani have grown closer through their mutual support of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad. In a meeting this week, they mostly focused on flourishing economic ties in the fields of energy and industry. Putin said in televised comments after the meeting that trade between the countries had “grown more than 70 percent” last year. “This is truly a good result considering that it was achieved in unstable global conditions and amid persistent volatility on the commodity and currency markets,” Putin said. A joint statement published by the Kremlin said that “special attention” had been paid to cooperation in energy, with both sides pledging to continue efforts to stabilize the international market.

  • Ezekiel 38-39 prophesies an alliance between Russia and Iran in an end-time war against Israel

Pakistan

A powerful car bomb exploded near a minority Shiite Muslim place of worship in the northwest town of Parachinar on Friday, killing at least 22 people and wounding over 70 others, officials said. The attack took place near Parachinar’s Shiite mosque. Jamaat-ul-Ahrar, a breakaway faction of Pakistani Taliban militants claimed responsibility for attack. The blast was so powerful it also damaged vehicles and nearby shops. Parachinar is a key town in the Kurram tribal region bordering Afghanistan, and it has been racked by sectarian violence in the past.

Venezuela

Venezuela’s president and Supreme Court backed down Saturday from a surprise move to strip congress of its legislative powers that had sparked widespread charges that the South American country was no longer a democracy. President Nicolas Maduro asked the Supreme Court in a late-night speech to review a ruling nullifying the lawmaking body after that decision set off a storm of criticism from the opposition as well as from foreign governments. The court on Saturday released new rulings that apparently reinstated congress’ authority. It was a rare instance of the embattled socialist president backing away from a move to increase his power. Opposition critics celebrated the reversal as proof that cracks are beginning to show in Maduro’s control of the country, with his approval ratings dipping below 20 percent amid a worsening economic and humanitarian crisis.

Peru

The roads cutting through the Amazon rain forest are lined with signs encouraging people to protect Peru’s natural resources and take care of the environment, but people aren’t sure why the government posts them anymore. Many rivers in Peru run orange with pollution from illegal gold mining as well as from cleared land where trees were cut away to make room for sifting towers and excavators. Peru, the largest gold producer in Latin America and the sixth largest in the world, has long struggled with illegal gold mining. Thousands of small, unchecked operations extracting gold from the Amazon are responsible for nearly 200 square miles of deforestation and mercury poisoning to the water so severe that several regions declared a state of emergency last year. President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski imposed stricter environmental regulations, streamlined the process to grant permits for legal mines and offered financial incentives for mining operations to submit to government oversight. imposed stricter environmental regulations, streamlined the process to grant permits for legal mines and offered financial incentives for mining operations to submit to government oversight.

Paraguay

Anti-government protesters in Paraguay’s capital set the country’s congressional building on fire Friday night. Protesters vandalized offices and hallways throughout the building in Asunción as the flames spread through the structure. Police vehicles also were targeted. Police fired rubber bullets at some of the protesters. The violence stems from the ruling party’s decision to create an alternative Senate with the purpose of passing a law that would allow President Horacio Cartes to seek re-election. A Senate meeting that was supposed to be held Saturday morning was canceled. Protesters indicated they will stop the demonstrations once they get a commitment from Cartes that he will not seek a second five-year term, something prohibited under the country’s 1992 constitution.

Wildfires

Traffic in and around Atlanta was even more of a tangled mess than usual Friday morning after a fire erupted from underneath Interstate 85 and caused a portion of it to collapse Thursday during rush hour. The Georgia DOT said Friday that in addition to the collapse of the northbound lanes, damage to the southbound lanes was so extensive that a section of those lanes must also be replaced. The cause of the fire remains unknown. Officials said it’s still too early to tell how long the construction will take. An estimated 250,000 vehicles drive daily through the closed stretch of I-85. Three people were arrested Friday in connection with the fire and charged with criminal damage to property. Officials would not discuss how the fire was started or why, saying those details would be released as the investigation progresses.

Weather

New England residents awoke Saturday morning and realized it was no April Fools’ joke after more than a foot of heavy snow blanketed parts of the region – and, it’s still snowing as of Saturday morning. The heavy, wet snow knocked out power to more than 12,000 customers in Maine. The Associated Press reports 6,000 customers are without power in Vermont, with 3,500 in the dark in New Hampshire. The heaviest snowfall total so far was reported in Washington, New Hampshire, where 16.5 inches of heavy snow was recorded. In Maine, 10.4 inches was recorded near North Windham and 15.8 inches fell near Rochester, Vermont.

Authorities are assessing damage Saturday, a day after severe storms lashed parts of Virginia and North Carolina, with several reports of unconfirmed tornadoes hitting areas south of Virginia Beach. A church in Chesapeake and dozens of beach homes in Virginia Beach suffered significant damage during the storms. About 50 homes were damaged by the storm, and twelve of them were condemned by the fire department. A second tornado reportedly passed between Suffolk and Chesapeake, Virginia. An additional tornado was reported in northeastern Bertie County, North Carolina, near Powellsville.

Las Vegas was reeling Friday, a day after an intense windstorm blew into the area, causing widespread power outages, toppling semi-trucks, ripping off roofs and injuring at least one person. Winds exceeding 70 mph knocked utility poles down onto cars near the famed Las Vegas strip. A gust of 82 mph clocked at the Red Rock Conservation Area west of Las Vegas. One person was injured when a construction wall collapsed inside the Monte Carlo Hotel and Casino. An estimated 44,000 customers were without power at the height of the storm. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency and encouraged drivers to use mass transit.

A siege of severe weather lashed parts of the South from Texas to Arkansas on Wednesday, killing two brothers who were electrocuted by downed power lines in Texas. The boys, ages 11 and 12, were killed Wednesday evening in a heavily wooded area near Oakland Lake Park in East Fort Worth. Damaging winds battered Texas and spawned a radar-confirmed tornado in Houston, where violent winds tossed shipping containers like toys. Most of the containers were empty but some full containers were also turned over.

The signs that California is emerging from its brutal five-year drought are everywhere, from a whopping snowpack in the Sierra Nevada to a spectacular “super bloom” that is turning some deserts into rare and dazzling displays of color. The snowpack along the 400-mile mountain range, which stretches north to south along the Nevada border, is critical to California’s water supply. On average, it provides about 30% of the state’s water needs as it melts in the spring and early summer. In its latest snow survey completed Thursday, the department found that the snowpack for the entire Sierra Nevada was at 164% of average for this time of year. In Yosemite National Park, a kiosk at the top of Tioga Pass that was easily accessible two years ago is now completely covered in snow.

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