Signs of the Times (5/6/17)

AHCA Defunds Planned Parenthood and Covers Pre-Existing Conditions

Rev. Patrick J. Mahoney, Director of the Christian Defense Coalition, stated: “We applaud this historic vote by the House of Representatives as a first step in defunding Planned Parenthood, which is the largest abortion provider in the world. Every day, Planned Parenthood takes the lives of almost 900 innocent children and over 320,000 every year. We will not rest until abortion ends up on the scrap heap of history like slavery and segregation.” Town Hall PM, published by Human Events, notes that “Insurers are required to sell plans to all comers, including those with pre-existing conditions. This is known as “guaranteed issue,” and it’s mandated in the AHCA. No exceptions, no waivers. Anyone who is insured and remains continuously insured cannot be dropped from their plan due to a pre-existing condition.”

Republican Health Care Bill Headed for Overhaul in Senate

While President Trump took a victory lap with House Republicans after their health care bill passed its first big test Thursday, the hard work is just beginning for the majority party whose mission these past seven years has been ObamaCare’s demise. Senate approval will be a much higher bar to clear: There’s no shortage of bipartisan criticism from the upper chamber right now, and the GOP holds a considerably smaller majority margin in the Senate. Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., said the Senate will write its own bill, stressing senators still need to see an official estimate on the updated plan’s impact for consumers and taxpayers – something the House did not have in hand when Republicans narrowly approved the American Health Care Act on a 217-213 vote Thursday. With 20 GOP defections on Thursday, the majority party was just two votes shy of another failure to pass the Obamacare repeal and replace bill. Republicans have a slim 52-48 majority, and it takes 60 votes to pass most legislation.

Hospitals, Doctors and Insurers Criticize Health Bill

It is a rare show of unity, hospitals, doctors, health insurers and some consumer groups, with few exceptions, are calling for significant changes to the Republican health care legislation that passed the House on Thursday. The bill’s impact is wide-ranging, potentially affecting not only the millions who could lose coverage through deep cuts in Medicaid or no longer be able to afford to buy coverage in the state marketplaces, but the bill also allows states to seek waivers from providing certain benefits. Employers big and small could scale back what they pay for each year or re-impose lifetime limits on coverage. In particular, small businesses, some of which were strongly opposed to the Affordable Care Act, could be free to drop coverage with no penalty. The prospect of millions of people unable to afford coverage led to an outcry from the health care industry as well as consumer groups. They found an uncommon ally in some insurers, who rely heavily on Medicaid and Medicare as mainstays of their business and hope the Senate will be more receptive to their concerns.

Health Care in Other Developed Nations Also in Trouble

Health care issues are not just a U.S. concern:

  • The U.K.’s public health system is financed through tax and compulsory national insurance contributions, but faces serious financial problems. Care is free at the point of delivery across the U.K., but long waiting times and a limited choice of hospital or physician can be a problem. That’s why roughly 11% also have private insurance, often offered as a perk by employers. Hospital doctors went on strike last year, because the government decided to impose new employment contracts. The doctors say the new system is unfair and unsafe.
  • Germany has a multi-layered system financed by a system of mutual insurance funds. Every employee must belong to one of the insurance funds and contribute according to their income. The cost is split between the employee and employers. Patients only pay a small fee to see a doctor. Higher earners are allowed to opt out of the public system and pay for private insurance instead — an option chosen by roughly 10% of Germans. Figures from the OECD show Germans see their doctors more often, get more prescription medicines, have higher hospital admittance numbers, and longer hospital stays than people in other developed countries. A 2013 official review of 2 million hospital stays in Germany found “overtreatment” in 40% of them.
  • The generous French health system has been ranked highly by the WHO and Euro Health Consumer Index. Everyone is covered by mandatory health insurance, which is taxpayer funded. Patients are expected to pay for roughly 20% of the cost of their treatment. However, more than 90% of French people also hold private insurance, usually provided by employers, which covers the patients’ share of the cost. The French system suffers from a chronic deficit. The government is trying to respond by insisting on greater use of generic medicines. It has cut the deficit and wants to achieve a surplus by 2019. But the reforms, including cuts in what’s covered by public insurance and attempts to increase the level of patient payments, are proving to be very unpopular.
  • Canada has a government-run national health insurance, funded by tax receipts. It is organized on a regional basis, with each province adopting slightly different rules. It ranks highly for quality of care, with lower incidence of heart disease and stroke mortality, highly rated cancer care and above average life expectancy at birth. But waiting times, especially for elective surgeries such as hip and knee replacements, can be a problem. According to a 2015 survey by the Fraser Institute, Canadians have to wait 18 weeks on average before receiving specialist treatment. That’s one of the longest waits in the developed world. The Commonwealth Fund, a foundation that studies health systems, said in 2014 that Canada ranked behind Australia, the U.K., U.S., France and Sweden in terms of patient experience with waiting times.

Trump’s First Overseas Trip to Saudi Arabia, Israel & Vatican

President Donald Trump is making his first trip overseas to Saudi Arabia, to meet with Arab leaders to talk about fighting the so-called Islamic State. “It lays to rest the notion that America is anti-Muslim,” Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir told reporters Thursday, saying it would “change the conversation with regards to America’s relationship with the Islamic world.” After Riyadh, Trump will travel to Israel and the Vatican-a tour meant to unite the world’s great religions against radicalism and to put a marker down for restarting Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, senior administration officials told reporters Thursday.

Refugee Admissions Tumble Under Trump

The number of refugees arriving in the United States has dropped sharply this year because of President Trump’s threats to bar their entry, even though his order for a total 120-day ban has been blocked twice by federal courts, a USA TODAY analysis of government figures shows. The U.S. accepted 2,070 refugees in March, the lowest monthly total since 2013, according to State Department data. April ended with 3,316 refugees admitted, the second-lowest total since 2013. Refugees are a special class of migrants who seek asylum because war, persecution or natural disasters have forced them to flee their home countries. Worldwide, there are more refugees than at any time since World War II as a result of so many regional conflicts, according to the United Nations. Faced with that crisis, President Barack Obama increased the number of refugees the U.S. accepts each year from 70,000 in fiscal year 2015, to 85,000 in 2016 and a proposed 110,000 in 2017. That compares to about 1 million Germany accepted in the past year. Trump, however, wants to lower that number to 50,000 because of concerns that terrorists might try to enter the U.S. posing as refugees.

State Department Announces Extreme Vetting Program

Following through on President Trump’s campaign promise to put immigrants to the U.S. through “extreme vetting,” the State Department announced new proposals Thursday to increase the screening of certain applicants. Under the proposals, such applicants would have to provide information including social media handles (i.e. pseudonyms IDs), phone numbers and emails for the last five years, prior passport numbers and additional information about their family, past travel and employment. However, consular officials would not be allowed to seek passwords or breach privacy controls on social media accounts. “Collecting additional information from visa applicants whose circumstances suggest a need for further scrutiny will strengthen our process for vetting these applicants and confirming their identity,” a State Department official told Fox News. “We estimate these changes would affect only a fraction of one percent of the more than 13 million annual visa applicants worldwide.”

DHS Catches Less Than 1% of Illegal Immigrant ‘Visa Overstays’

Homeland Security still can’t track when visitors to the U.S. leave the country — leaving deportation officers struggling to try to find millions of people who have managed to disappear into the shadows, according to a new watchdog report released Thursday. Officers have to use 27 different computer systems to try to figure out if someone actually left the country when they were supposed to, presenting a gargantuan task that often stymies their efforts to spot and kick out illegal immigrants, the Homeland Security inspector general reported. And the data the officers are using is so bad that they often get false negatives, meaning a target appears to have left the country even though they never did — allowing criminals to remain at large in the U.S. without anyone looking for them. “Such false departure information resulted in ERO officers closing visa overstay investigations of dangerous individuals, such as suspected criminals, who were actually still in the United States and could pose a threat to national security,” the investigators said in the report.

NSA Collected 151 Million Phone Records in 2016

The National Security Agency collected up more than 151 million records about Americans’ phone calls last year via a new system that Congress created to end the agency’s once-secret program that collected domestic calling records in bulk, according to a report published Tuesday by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Although the number is large on its face, it nonetheless represents a massive reduction from the amount of information the agency gathered previously. Under the old system, it collected potentially “billions of records per day,” according to a 2014 study. Since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, the agency has analyzed large amounts of communications metadata — records showing who contacted whom, but not what they said — to hunt for associates of terrorism suspects. For years, it did so by collecting domestic call records in bulk. That program came to light via the 2013 leaks by the former intelligence contractor Edward J. Snowden. The National Security Agency took in the 151 million records despite obtaining court orders to use the system on only 42 terrorism suspects in 2016, along with a few left over from late 2015, the report said.

Ambushes of Police on the Rise

Ambush-style attacks on U.S. police officers soared 167 percent in 2016, hitting a 10-year high. So far this year, the disturbing cycle of attacks has not relented. Police were ambushed Tuesday night in Chicago and Sunday night in Detroit, following an ambush on Miami cops just a few weeks ago. According to the National Law Enforcement Officers’ Memorial Fund, which tracks officer shootings, the number of cops shot in the line of duty spiked 56 percent in 2016, but the number of ambush-style attacks was even more troubling, up 167 percent, soaring from six in 2015 to 21 in 2016. And the trend has continued into 2017. Police in Chicago launched an all-out manhunt Wednesday for a suspect who shot two officers in a surprise attack as they sat in their patrol car. On Sunday night in Detroit, two officers responded to a domestic call. When they arrived to knock on the door, 46-year-old James Edward Ray, who reportedly had no connection to the domestic call, opened fire on them. Just over a month ago, on March 28, two officers in Miami-Dade County were shot in an unprovoked ambush outside an apartment complex while they were on routine surveillance.

Alarming Rise in Children Hospitalized with Suicidal Tendencies

The percentage of younger children and teens hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or actions in the United States doubled over nearly a decade, according to new research. A steady increase in admissions due to suicidal tendencies and serious self-harm occurred at 32 children’s hospitals across the nation from 2008 through 2015, the researchers found. The children studied were between the ages of 5 and 17, and although all age groups showed increases, the largest uptick was seen among teen girls. Females are more likely to attempt, but males in general are more likely to succeed, the study notes. Slightly more than half, 59,631 children, were between the ages 15 and 17, and nearly 37% were between 12 and 14. Children 5 through 11 — a total of 15,050 kids — represented nearly 13% of the total. Cyberbullying is seen as a major contributor for the increase. The study did not examine data for completed suicides.

Puerto Rico, the ‘Fifty-First’ State, Declares Bankruptcy

After years of economic distress, ballooning debt, bloated bureaucracy and tax hikes on the island, Puerto Rico’s oversight board on Wednesday asked a federal court for bankruptcy protection from its creditors. The oversight board appointed to lead the U.S. territory back to fiscal sustainability declared in a court filing that it was “unable to provide its citizens effective services,” crushed by $74 billion in debts and $49 billion in pension liabilities. A little-noticed provision in a bill signed into law in 2016 places the fate of Puerto Rico in the hands of the Supreme Court’s chief justice. The Puerto Rico Oversight, Management and Economic Stability signed into law by President Obama gives Roberts the power to appoint a District Court judge to oversee the bankruptcy-like case involving a U.S. territory. Traditional municipal bankruptcies (e.g. Detroit) are overseen by bankruptcy judges. District Court judges, unlike bankruptcy judges, are political appointees. As other municipal bankruptcies have demonstrated, the judge in control of the case retains significant influence over the outcome.

  • Just as in Detroit, pension liabilities play a big roll and will continue to drag down more municipalities in the near future due to large, unfunded pension obligations

Economic News

America’s job market rebounded in April, adding a solid 211,000 jobs, far surpassing the disappointing 79,000 jobs gained in March, according to Labor Department figures released Friday. The unemployment rate dropped to 4.4%, its lowest level since May 2007. Unemployment was 10% when the recession ended in 2009. Many economists say the US is now at or near “full employment,” meaning the unemployment rate won’t go down significantly more and wage growth should start to speed up. Wages grew 2.5% in April compared to a year ago.

What housing recovery? Only about one-third of U.S. homes have topped their prerecession price peaks. The median U.S. home price was $196,500 in March, up from $151,900 at the market nadir in April 2012, Trulia figures show. And the vast majority of homes are worth more than what current owners paid for them. However, Trulia’s study concludes that just 34.2% of homes nationally have surpassed their previous highs. Some metro areas have fully recovered from the housing crash, particularly in the West and South. Many of these places have benefited from strong job, income or population growth, such as technology hubs Denver, San Francisco and Portland, each of which has seen more than 90% of homes exceed their prerecession records.

Middle East

President Donald Trump announced during his meeting with visiting Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on Wednesday that he is preparing to launch a fresh initiative aimed at resolving the decades-long conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. “Over the course of my lifetime, I’ve always heard that perhaps the toughest deal to make is the deal between the Israelis and the Palestinians,” Trump said. “Let’s see if we can prove them wrong.” Trump addressed Abbas directly, telling him that he expected there to be an end to incitement against Jews and Israelis in Palestinian school curriculum and popular media. Abbas replied by assuring his host that there was already nothing but peace and co-existence taught to Palestinian schoolchildren, a claim belied by much evidence which has been published over the last two decades.

The Hamas Islamic militant movement that controls the Gaza Strip announced Saturday it had chosen its former Gaza prime minister Ismail Haniyeh as the group’s new political chief. Haniyeh succeeds Hamas’ longtime exiled leader Khaled Mashaal and the move comes shortly after Gaza’s rulers unveiled a new, seemingly more pragmatic political program aimed at ending the group’s international isolation. Hamas is trying to rebrand itself as an Islamic national liberation movement, rather than a branch of the pan-Arab Muslim Brotherhood, which has been outlawed by Egypt. It has also dropped explicit language calling for Israel’s destruction, though it retains the goal of eventually “liberating” all of historic Palestine, which includes what is now Israel.

The Israeli leadership dismissed a resolution by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO) executive board that rejects Israeli sovereignty and jurisdiction over Jerusalem. The resolution, passed on Tuesday, as Israel celebrated Independence Day, or Yom Ha’atzmaut, refers to the Jewish state as an occupying power in Jerusalem and declares all its legislative and administrative measures in the city as “null and void.” A majority of 22 states voted in favor, 10 voted against and 23 abstained. While the overall outcome was negative for Israel, the vote marked a shift from the near-unanimous approval seen in previous anti-Israel UNESCO votes on Jerusalem, with 23 member states abstaining and 10 – the US, Italy, the UK, the Netherlands, Lithuania, Greece, Paraguay, Ukraine, Togo and Germany – opposing.

Islamic State

A State Department official on Friday said that the Russian proposal calling to bar U.S. military aircrafts from flying over designated safe zones cannot “limit” the U.S.’s mission against ISIS in the country in any way. A deal hammered out by Russia, Turkey and Iran to set up “de-escalation zones” in mostly opposition-held parts of Syria went into effect Saturday. The plan is the latest international attempt to reduce violence in the war-ravaged country, and is the first to envisage armed foreign monitors on the ground in Syria. The United States is not party to the agreement and the Syrian rivals have not signed on to the deal. “The coalition will continue to strike ISIS targets in Syria,” the official told The Wall Street Journal. “The campaign to defeat ISIS will continue at the same relentless pace as it is proceeding now.”

North Korea

North Korea on Friday accused U.S. and South Korean intelligence services of hatching a plot to assassinate dictator Kim Jong Un with a “biochemical substance.” According to North Korea’s state-run Korean Central News Agency, “a hideous terrorists’ group” directed by CIA and South Korean spies “ideologically corrupted” a North Korean dissident identified as “Kim” and paid the man more than $20,000 to carry out the attack. The claim comes amid rising tensions between the U.S. and North Korea over the reclusive regime’s nuclear weapons program and recent provocative ballistic missile tests. The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday voted to impose new sanctions on North Korea, the latest attempt by U.S. officials to deter North Korea from carrying out a sixth nuclear test.

Afghanistan

Despite the recent deployment of more U.S. troops to Afghanistan and other heightened efforts to eradicate terrorist groups, especially ISIS, Afghanistan’s former president, Hamid Karzai, believes the U.S. is in league with ISIS. “The Daesh is a U.S. product,” he told Fox News in an exclusive interview Wednesday in Kabul, using the Arabic word for the extremist Muslim group. “The Daesh — which is clearly foreign — emerged in 2015 during the U.S. presence.” Karzai, who was president from December 2004 to September 2014, said he routinely receives reports about unmarked helicopters dropping supplies to the terror faction on the Pakistan and Afghanistan border — something that the “U.S. must explain.” He also expressed great distress at the dropping of the Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB) last month, convinced it was a joint U.S.-ISIS operation. “The Daesh had already emptied most of their (families and fighters) so this was coordinated. This group is just a U.S. tool.”

  • More likely, it’s the globalist elite who seek to establish a one-world government who are aiding ISIS. By creating more division and hostility in the world, the call for global leadership will increase, they believe.

Iran

Iran attempted to launch a cruise missile from a submarine in the Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday but the test failed, two U.S. officials told Fox News. An Iranian Yono-class “midget” submarine conducted the missile launch. North Korea and Iran are the only two countries in the world that operate this type of submarine. In February, Iran claimed to have successfully tested a submarine-launched missile. It was not immediately clear if Tuesday’s test was the first time Iran had attempted to launch a missile underwater from a submarine.

France

The campaign of French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron said it suffered a “massive and coordinated” hacking attack and document leak that it said was a bid to destabilize Sunday’s presidential runoff. Fears of hacking, fake news manipulation and Russian meddling clouded the French campaign but had largely gone unrealized — until late Friday’s admission by Macron’s campaign that it had suffered a coordinated online pirate attack. It was unclear who was behind the hack and the leak. His far-right rival Marine Le Pen, meanwhile, told The Associated Press that she believes she can pull off a surprise victory in the high-stakes vote that could change Europe’s direction. Security alerts in and around Paris have French officials worried as presidential candidates Marine Le Pen and Emmanuel Macron face off this weekend.

Environment

A killer whale found dead on the Scottish island of Tiree had one of the highest levels of PCB pollution ever recorded, scientists say. Lulu, well known to researchers as one of the last surviving whales in the waters around Britain, died after becoming entangled in fishing rope in January 2016. The Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme and the University of Aberdeen conducted an in-depth investigation of Lulu’s corpse and were shocked by the findings. “Given what is known about the toxic effects of PCBs, we have to consider (the contamination) could have been affecting her health and reproductive fitness,” said veterinary pathologist Andrew Brownlow.

Weather

Powerful storms swept through the South Thursday night and Friday morning, and major damage was reported in at least one southeastern Georgia town. Authorities said at least five people were injured when a reported tornado damaged several buildings in the town of Garden City, located 5 miles northwest of Savannah. An Advance Auto Parts store was destroyed. Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport also saw storms Thursday evening – one of which spawned a funnel cloud spotted near the hub. Minor damage was reported near one of the airport’s cargo facilities immediately following the storms, but no injuries were reported. The storms also left damage in South Carolina, west of Charleston. Severe weather damage was reported in the towns of Walterboro and Holly Hill Thursday night.

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