Signs of the Times (5/11/17)

Molecular Genetics says Just Two Genders

After extensive study of the human genome, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science discovered there are no less than 6,500 genes “that are expressed…. differently in the two sexes.” Since there are about 30,000 genes in the entire human genome, this means more than 20 percent of it codes for traits that are gender specific. The Weizmann Institute of Science is a public research university in Rehovot, Israel, south of Tel Aviv established in 1934. The scientists at Weizman used something called the GTEx project, a comprehensive study of human gene expression in the organs and tissues of 550 adult donors. For the first time ever, they were able to develop a comprehensive map of the sex-differential in genetic architecture between the two sexes.

  • There are so many genetic differences between male and female, that efforts to change gender can only be minimally effective, leaving the so-called transgender in genetic confusion. It is a corrupted gene pool in this fallen world that has caused many to question their gender.

Trump Fires FBI Director James Comey

The search for a new permanent FBI director will move full-steam ahead Wednesday after President Trump stunned the political world by firing James Comey, abruptly ending a tenure marked by political controversies.  Basing the decision on a recommendation by the Justice Department, who excoriated Comey for his handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server during her time as secretary of State, Trump’s decision calls into question the future of the investigation into Russian hacking of the 2016 presidential election. Democrats were quick to slam Trump’s move as a blatant attempt to short-circuit the Russia investigation, with many calling for the appointment of a special prosecutor. As calls for an independent prosecutor intensify on both sides of the aisle, President Trump and aides argued Wednesday that, “The Democrats have said some of the worst things about James Comey, including the fact that he should be fired,” Trump tweeted.

Investigation into Trump’s Russian Ties Intensifies

The Senate Intelligence Committee is expected to hear the testimony of acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe and other national security officials on Thursday as part of its ongoing investigation into Russia’s interference with the 2016 election. James Comey, ousted from his role as FBI director by President Trump, had been scheduled to testify, and Democrats said Comey should still appear so he can answer questions about the status of the FBI’s probe and its potential connection to his dismissal. Late Wednesday, the committee subpoenaed former national security adviser Michael Flynn for information about communications with Russian officials that might be relevant to its investigation.

Texas Crackdown on Sanctuary Cities

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton already has filed suit against local jurisdictions that had been accused of not cooperating with federal immigration agents, in a preemptive bid to uphold a newly signed anti-sanctuary city law and head off numerous legal challenges. Paxton filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, as Gov. Greg Abbott on Sunday signed the SB4 crackdown law which bars sanctuary policies and gives local law enforcement officers the right to ask the immigration status of anyone they stop. Under the law, local officers who won’t cooperate with federal immigration agents could face jail time and fines up to $25,000 per day. Texas isn’t the first state to ban sanctuary cities. More than 80 bills related to sanctuary policies are pending across the country, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Thousands Fleeing Chicago Due to Increased Violence

An estimated 89,000 more people moved from the Chicago area to other portions of the country in the past year than those who moved in, according to the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning. In particular, wealthy people are living the city in droves.  It has been reported that 3,000 millionaires left the city of Chicago in 2015 alone. High taxes are one reason given, but gang violence has also been a major factor. In 2016, the number of murders in the city jumped nearly 60 percent to over 760, more than New York and Los Angeles combined. There were more than 4,300 shooting victims in the city last year, according to police. Decades of open borders and unrestrained illegal immigration have contributed to rapid growth in gang membership, now numbering over 150,000 in the metropolitan area, according to the Chicago Crime Commission. There are currently 12,244 police officers in Chicago. That means that the police are outnumbered by at least a 12 to 1 margin. The Chicago Police Department warned its officers Monday about gangs armed with high-powered weapons, after three people were shot to death over the weekend and two cops were targeted in an ambush last week. Prosecutors said Monday that a reputed gang member sprayed a police van with more than two dozen rounds from an assault rifle after mistaking the vehicle and plainclothes officers inside for rival gang members.

Kentucky on Its Way to Becoming First Abortion-Free State

Kentucky is on its way to becoming the first state with no abortion clinics. There is only one abortion clinic left in the state and officials say that the clinic has not complied with basic safety standards. LifeNews.com reports that the administration of Kentucky’s conservative Christian Gov. Matt Bevin is working to end access to abortion in the state. Administration officials argue that EMW Women’s Clinic–the last clinic open for business–is in violation of regulations that mandate the clinic obtain ambulance and hospital admittance privileges from a local hospital. The clinic maintains that it is not in violation of these regulations and, along with Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky, filed a lawsuit against the state. Gov. Bevin said, “This administration will have no tolerance for the type of brazen disregard that Planned Parenthood has shown for both the safety of women and the rule of law. We will hold Planned Parenthood accountable for knowingly endangering their patients by providing illegal abortions at a facility that was not properly licensed nor prepared to handle an emergency.”

Americans Dissatisfied with Colleges

American adults are deeply divided about the U.S. higher education system and are increasingly frustrated with the costs, a new report released on Thursday finds. The survey, conducted by left-leaning think tank New America, found that only one in four adults believe that the higher education system is functioning as it should. Dissatisfaction is especially keen among Millennials, who have experienced rising dropout rates and dealt with debilitating school debt. Community colleges were one of the few bright spots in the study which surprised researchers, who found that many Americans see them as more promising and cost-effective than either their public or private four-year counterparts.

Life Expectancy Varies Widely by County in U.S.

Life expectancy at birth differs by as much as 20 years between the lowest and highest United States counties, according to new research published Monday in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Overall life expectancy at birth in the U.S. increased by 5.3 years for both men and women — from 73.8 years to 79.1 years — between 1980 and 2014. During that time period, men gained 6.7 years, from 70 years on average to 76.7 years, while women gained four years, from 77.5 years to 81.5 years. The counties with lowest life expectancy are located in South and North Dakota, while counties along the lower half of Mississippi, in eastern Kentucky, and southwestern West Virginia also showed lower life expectancies compared to the rest of the nation. The North and South Dakota counties include Native American reservations. At the other extreme, residents of counties in central Colorado can expect to live longest. Summit County, Colorado, ranked as the county with highest life expectancy in 2014 at 86.8 years, is home to several ski resort towns. The study shows that “60% of the differences in life expectancy across counties can be explained by socioeconomic factors alone” yet that leaves a “substantial amount of unexplained differences.” “Behaviors like smoking and physical activity, along with risk factors like obesity and diabetes, are also very important,” the report said.

Aetna Says Good-Bye to Obamacare

Aetna is saying goodbye to Obamacare. The insurance giant announced Wednesday that it would not offer policies in Nebraska or Delaware next year, completing its exit from the exchanges. Earlier this year, Aetna said it would pull out of Iowa and Virginia in 2018. The company said it expects to lose more than $200 million in its individual business line this year, on top of nearly $700 million in losses between 2014 and 2016. Aetna withdrew from 11 of its 15 markets for 2017. It has 255,000 Obamacare policyholders this year, down from 964,000 at the end of last year. These customers, however, continue to be costlier than the company expected, Aetna said. Aetna’s exit leaves Medica as the only insurer on the Nebraska exchange and Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield as the sole carrier on the Delaware exchange. Aetna’s withdrawal is the latest in a series of insurers leaving Obamacare. The exodus began last year, when several carriers announced they were exiting or downsizing in 2017 after suffering large losses. Humana already announced it is completely abandoning the individual market in 2018. UnitedHealthcare pulled out of Virginia, and Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield said it would stop selling individual policies in Iowa in 2018.

Retail Woes Continue

The tale of woe for traditional retailers continues. Macy’s, Kohl’s and Dillard’s all reported lower sales for the last three months and missed Wall Street’s forecasts. Department store chains have been struggling lately due to intense competition from Amazon, a resurgent Walmart and newer retailers like Uniqlo, H&M and Zara. These three retail icons aren’t the only ones that have been hit hard by a rapid change in how consumers shop. Sears continues to struggle. And JCPenney, which will report its latest results Friday morning, has been unable to find a way to get sales growing either. Target has been hit hard as well. And former teen fashion king Abercrombie & Fitch is now looking for someone to buy it. American Apparel, Wet Seal, The Sports Authority and Aeropostale have all filed for bankruptcy. RadioShack has gone bankrupt — twice. All of this turmoil has led to tens of thousands of layoffs in the retail sector as well.

Economic News

Drivers are getting a break at the pump, thanks to the recent slide in crude oil prices. Gas prices have fallen virtually every day for the last three weeks, pushed down by the sudden drop in crude oil prices. The national average is now $2.34 a gallon for regular, according to AAA, about 8 cents cheaper than it was on April 20. Crude oil prices have fallen about 11% since early April. Typically this is a time of the year when gas prices are going up, not down, as refiners switch over to making the more expensive form of gasoline used during the summer months.

America has 5.7 million openings, according to the latest data from the Labor Department. That’s close to the record number of job openings since Labor started tracking them in 2000. The U.S. had an all-time high of 5.9 million openings last July. Employers are hiring and workers are starting to feel more confident about leaving a job for another one. Experts say that such a high number of job openings is due partially to a gap between the job skills employers demand and the skills job seekers have.

The number one reason a large number of Americans wind up in financial trouble and have to file for bankruptcy has nothing to do with self-indulgence. Rather, it’s because of medical debt. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), more than a quarter of U.S. adults struggle to pay their medical bills. This includes folks who have insurance, whether independently or through an employer. In fact, medical debt is the No. 1 source of personal bankruptcy filings in the U.S., and in 2014, an estimated 40% of Americans racked up debt resulting from a medical issue.

The euro notched up its highest level in six months after centrist reformer Emmanuel Macron won the French presidential election on Sunday, neutralizing the biggest political challenge to the currency in its 18-year history. His far-right opponent, Marine Le Pen, had threatened to scrap the euro and reintroduce France’s old money — the franc. Losing its second biggest economy could have spelled the end of the euro.

Persecution Watch

An Indonesian court has sentenced Jakarta’s governor, who is a Christian, to two years in prison on a charge of blasphemy. Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, nicknamed Ahok, was charged for using a Quranic verse in his re-election campaign in September. Opponents of Ahok had used the same verse to argue that Muslims should not choose a non-Muslim to lead them. Ahok said his opponents had used the verse to trick people into voting against him. According to ChristianToday.com, his speech that included the verse was posted online and soon went viral. Protests were started, including one that drew about half a million people. Ahok lost the election in April and his term ends in October. Now he’s headed to jail. Said Judge Dwiarso Budi Santiaro of the sentencing: “As part of a religious society, the defendant should be careful to not use words with negative connotations regarding the symbols of religions, including the religion of the defendant himself.”

Mexico

Mexico was the second deadliest country in the world last year. Although Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan dominated the news, Mexico’s drug wars claimed 23,000 lives during 2016 — second only to Syria, where 50,000 people died as a result of the civil war. “This is all the more surprising, considering that the conflict deaths [in Mexico] are nearly all attributable to small arms,” said John Chipman, chief executive and director-general of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), which issued its annual survey of armed conflict on Tuesday. “The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan claimed 17,000 and 16,000 lives respectively in 2016, although in lethality they were surpassed by conflicts in Mexico and Central America, which have received much less attention from the media and the international community,” said Anastasia Voronkova, the editor of the survey.

France

The European political establishment breathed a heavy sigh of relief Sunday, as French voters easily elected pragmatic centrist Emmanuel Macron as president over right-wing challenger Marine Le Pen, who threatened to upend Europe’s existing order. Macron won with 66% of the vote against 34% for Le Pen, with 99% of the votes counted. Le Pen, of the National Front party, had threatened to curb immigration, particularly for Muslims, pull France out of the European Union and return the country to the French franc — moves that would have caused political and economic upheaval in Europe and around the world. Macron’s victory, coming on the heels of defeats for right-wing populist candidates in Austria and the Netherlands, appears to blunt the anti-establishment fervor sweeping Europe amid a backlash against economic stagnation, a flood of migrants pouring into their countries and a string of nerve-rattling terror attacks. Macron, 39, is a former investment banker and economy minister who strongly supports the European Union. He will become France’s youngest president, despite never having held any elected office before.

Middle East

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday lashed out at Israel and urged Muslims to flood Jerusalem’s Temple Mount, what Muslims call the Noble Sanctuary. Speaking in Istanbul to the International Forum on Al-Quds Waqfs, a conference aimed at promoting Palestinian economic development, Erdogan said that about 26,000 Turks visited Jerusalem last year — the highest number among Muslim countries. In contrast, he said about 600,000 Americans, 400,000 Russians and 300,000 French citizens visited Jerusalem in 2015. “We, as Muslims, should be visiting Al-Quds more often,” he said, referring to Jerusalem by its Arabic name, calling those visits “the greatest support to our brothers there.”

Erdogan criticized Israeli policy toward Palestinians as “racist” and “discriminatory.” “Here is the only solution: the establishment of a fully sovereign and independent Palestinian state, with East Jerusalem as its capital along the lines of 1967,” he said. The Israel Foreign Ministry responded to Erdogan’s comments with a strongly-worded statement: “Whoever systematically violates human rights in their own country should not preach morality to the only true democracy in the region. Israel consistently protects total freedom of worship for Jews, Muslims and Christians — and will continue to do so despite the baseless smears launched against it.”

The Pentagon announced Tuesday that President Donald Trump had authorized arming the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), green-lighting a US policy that had sat on the backburner for years to avoid confrontation with Turkey, a key NATO ally. It said that the provision of supplies and weapons was aimed at aiding the only group it sees fit enough to retake the Syrian city of Raqqa, the ISIS group’s de facto capital. Turkey lashed out at Washington’s plan to send arms to Kurdish rebels fighting ISIS in Syria, calling for an end to the U.S. strategy that has long rattled Ankara. The YPG is part of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a coalition of rebel fighters that Washington considers its main ally in the country. But Ankara sees the YPG as a terrorist organization threatening Turkish sovereignty.

North Korea

An American teacher was detained in North Korea over the weekend, raising to four the number of U.S. citizens now being held by the communist nation’s authoritarian regime. Kim Hak-song had worked at the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology, the same school where American Tony Kim had worked prior to being arrested at Pyongyang International Airport two weeks ago. Other Americans being held in North Korea include Ohio native Otto Warmbier, a University of Virginia student who was arrested in January 2016 while he was on a tour of North Korea, and Kim Dong Chul, who was arrested in October 2015 while in North Korea on business. Relations between the U.S. and North Korea have grown more strained in recent months as Pyongyang conducts nuclear and ballistic missile tests in defiance of international bans.

South Korea

Moon Jae-in won South Korea’s presidential election Tuesday after his two main rivals conceded, possibly opening a rift with the United States over relations with North Korea. The election result was driven largely by domestic concerns over corruption and a slowing economy, but Moon, a liberal, has signaled a softer approach toward neighboring North Korea than his predecessor, the hawkish Park Geun-hye. Park, the nation’s first female president, was impeached over corruption charges in March, triggering the election. Moon, 64, has questioned the effectiveness of the strict sanctions against North Korea and left the door open for greater diplomatic and economic ties with the reclusive communist country.

Nigeria

Boko Haran, an extremist group allied with the Islamic State, released 82 young women it had held captive for more than three years, government officials said late Saturday. The terrorist group is still holding an estimated 100 young women hostage. They were kidnapped from a school in the town of Chibok in April 2014. President Muhammadu Buhari’s office said in a statement that the girls were found near the town of Banki in Borno state near Cameroon. Government officials said the women were released in exchange for an unspecified number of imprisoned Boko Haram members. The girls were undergoing medical checks before being airlifted to Maiduguri, a city in Nigeria’s northeast.

Afghanistan

Afghanistan’s air force has pounded Islamic State targets in an eastern province where an Afghan and U.S. military raid last month killed the militant group’s top commander, the government said on Monday. The Interior Ministry said the airstrikes killed at least 34 Islamic State fighters over the past 24 hours and destroyed an insurgent-controlled radio station in Nangarhar province. The ministry also said that the strikes targeted ISIS hideouts in Nazyan and Achin districts. The government statement came after Pentagon announced on Sunday night that a military raid last month killed Abdul Haseeb Logari, the ISIS chief in Nangarhar.

Venezuela

Infant and maternal deaths and cases of malaria are skyrocketing in Venezuela, which is grappling with severe medical shortages during the country’s economic meltdown and political chaos. Confirmed malaria cases in 2016 stood at 240,000, a 76% increase over 2015. Maternal deaths rose 66% to 756. Last year, 11,466 infants died, a 30% increase, according to new records recently released by Venezuela’s health ministry. The staggering increases illustrate how badly Venezuela lacks basic medicine, equipment and supplies to treat even the simplest of injuries. According to statistics released by the Venezuelan Pharmaceutical Federation, by June 2016, the country was already facing a shortage of more than 80% of the medicines doctors need. More than 13,000 doctors — about 20% of the country’s medical workforce — have left the country in recent years due to the collapse of the health sector.

Wildfires

Evacuations in the St. George area of Georgia have led to the closure of Charlton County schools for both students and staff, according to a statement from the district. Firefighters are using St. George Elementary School as a staging area for firefighters. The West Mims fire has scorched about 208 square miles in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge and is 12 percent contained as of Tuesday morning. Conditions have not been ideal for firefighters attempting to control the blaze. Temperatures are warm, the air is dry and winds have been gusting. The area, on the Georgia-Florida line, is also under a dense smoke advisory that is expected to impact visibility in the towns of St. George, Callahan, Ratliff and northern Duval County near the Jacksonville International airport. Some road closures were in effect and the main entrance to the refuge was closed.

It has been a long, costly spring for Flordia, where dozens of fires continue to burn. Gov. Rock Scott declared a state of emergency in April. More than 2,000 wildfires have been reported statewide this year, and those blazes have claimed at least 230 square miles of land. Currently, there are more than 125 wildfires actively burning across the state. “Florida is in the middle of its worst wildfire season in years – with no end in sight,” Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam told CBS Miami. Nationally, 20,482 wildfires have consumed 1,998, 139 acres of land through May 5, significantly more than the ten-year average of 841,462 acres, although the number of wildfires is down from 20,779. That means the average acreage burned per wildfire is way up, from 40.5 acres per fire to 97.6, more than double.

Weather

Severe thunderstorms rolled through Colorado Monday afternoon, dumping hail as big as baseballs in some areas and blanketing downtown Denver in a thick layer of the frozen precipitation. In most areas, the hailstones did not exceed the size of golf balls, but that was enough to punch out car windshields and the windows of some businesses. In Wheat Ridge, just northwest of downtown Denver, baseball-sized hail was observed, the National Weather Service said.

Drought coverage in the Lower 48 is at its lowest level in 17 years of records, according to last week’s update of the U.S. Drought Monitor, providing a stunning contrast to the opposite extreme experienced a few years ago. About 5 percent of the contiguous United States was in drought as of May 2. The largest drought coverage ever analyzed by the Drought Monitor occurred on Sept. 25, 2012 when 65 percent of the U.S. – particularly the Plains, Midwest and West – was experiencing drought, much of it severe, especially California.

Tropical Storm Adrian kicked off a record early start to the 2017 eastern Pacific hurricane season Tuesday several hundred miles off the southern Mexican coast, but appears destined for a long-lived stall off the coast into at least next week. Adrian was the earliest tropical cyclone to form in the northeast Pacific in the satellite era. This record was previously held by Hurricane Alma in 1990. Tropical Storm Adrian is centered about 460 miles south-southeast of Salina Cruz, Mexico, and is moving slowly toward the northwest. It weakened into a tropical depression Thursday.

Nations around the world have adopted more than 1,200 laws to curb climate change, up from about 60 two decades ago, which is a sign of widening efforts to limit rising temperatures, a study showed on Tuesday. The study, by the London School of Economics (LSE), reviewed laws and executive policies in 164 nations, ranging from national cuts in greenhouse gases to curbs in emissions in sectors such as transport, power generation or industry. Forty-seven laws had been added since world leaders adopted a Paris Agreement to combat climate change in late 2015, a slowdown from a previous peak of about 100 a year from 2009-2013.

  • End-time climate change is prophesied in the Bible (Daniel 9:26b, Ezekiel 38:22, Revelation 8:7, 11:19, 16:8,11). Human efforts to counter it will fail.

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