Signs of the Times (5/15/17)

China Projected to Have World’s Largest Christian Population by 2030

According to a report from The Christian Post, China is on track to have the largest Christian population in the world by 2030, despite the increased persecution Chinese Christians have been experiencing. The report projects 200 million Chinese believers by 2030. China’s current government under President Xi Jinping is increasingly hostile toward Christians and Christianity. Hundreds of churches have been destroyed, their cross symbols removed, and Christians have been imprisoned, tortured, or even killed for their faith. Despite the persecution and lack of religious freedom, however, many Chinese Christians echo the words of Yu Jie, a Christian democracy activist: “Neither the dead hand of Communism, nor the cynical imitation of Confucianism, nor capitalism, nor democracy, nor any earthly thing will determine the fate of my land.”

Only 17% of ‘Christians’ Have biblical Worldview

A vast majority of Americans who call themselves Christians do not hold a biblical worldview, a new study by the Barna Group finds. Only 17 percent do, the survey showed. The research “found strong agreement with ideas unique to nonbiblical worldviews among practicing Christians.” Elements rooted in new age spirituality were supported by 61 percent. Fifty-four percent identified with postmodern beliefs, 36 percent with Marxism and 29 percent with secularism. “For instance, almost three in 10 … practicing Christians strongly agree that ‘all people pray to the same god or spirit, no matter what name they use for that spiritual being,’” Barna reported. A large number of Christians also embrace secularism in their worldviews. One of its component beliefs, materialism, holds that the material world is all that exists. Those respondents told Barna that the purpose of life is “’to earn as much as possible so you can make the most of life.’” That attitude was shared by 20 percent of so-called Christians.

  • The ‘falling away’ prophesied in the Bible (2Thessalonians 2:3) is underway in earnest

Rebellion Grows Against Muslim Indoctrination in Public Schools

From coast to coast, parents are rebelling against what they describe as Islamic indoctrination of their children in public schools. In Florida, for example, parents are protesting a newly approved textbook they say whitewashes Islam’s violent history of conquest and subjugation. Last week, a Groesbeck, Texas, couple moved their sixth-grade daughter to a new school after they discovered her history homework assignment on Islam. In one assignment, students were asked to list the five tenets of Islam required for salvation. In late March, a middle school in Chatham, New Jersey, was using a cartoon video to teach the Five Pillars of Islam to seventh-grade students. Meanwhile, in an initiative to “combat Islamophobia and the bullying of Muslims students,” the San Diego Unified School District, as WND reported, has formed a partnership with CAIR (Council on American-Islamic Relations). In a late April school board meeting, the Blaze reported, parent Christopher Wyrick confronted the San Diego school board about the Islamic instruction attached to the program and its relationship with the Islamic group. CAIR has sued the authors of a WND Books exposé, “Muslim Mafia: Inside the Secret Underworld That’s Conspiring to Islamize America,” which documented the group’s radical ties. A trial in the case is expected to commence this fall.

  • Not a whiff of Christianity is allowed in our public schools, so why is the teaching of Islam allowed? Anti-bullying and anti-persecution teaching can be accomplished without teaching the tenets of Islam.

Christians in Syria Boiled, Burned, Beheaded

The American Center for Law & Justice reports that Christians face unthinkable barbarity in Syria from ISIS operatives. Many are boiled, burned alive, and beheaded. Two-thirds of Syria’s Christians have been murdered or displaced. Up to 87% of Iraq’s Christians have been decimated. ISIS bombed two churches on Palm Sunday, and is threatening all “Christian gatherings” in Egypt. It’s crucifying children. There are mass graves of Christians. Franklin Graham, son of the famed evangelical preacher Billy Graham, urged fellow Christians to struggle against a “Christian genocide” that he says has killed in greater numbers than most believers can fathom. “It is safe to say that over 100,000 a year are killed because of their faith in Christ. In the last 10 years that would be close to a million people. It’s the equivalent of a Christian genocide,” Graham told the World Summit in Defense of Christians.

Tennessee Passes Strict Anti-Abortion Law

Tennessee’s governor signed a strict new abortion measure into law Friday, drawing praise and sharp criticism. The measure will further limit the few abortions already performed in Tennessee past the point of fetal viability — and potentially send doctors to jail if they fail to prove in court that an abortion of a viable fetus was necessary to save a woman’s life or prevent substantial or irreversible harm to a “major bodily function of a pregnant woman.” On July 1, Tennessee will become one of at least 21 states that explicitly ban abortions beyond viability. But the measure, called the Tennessee Infants Protection Act, goes further than most other bans and could become the subject of a lengthy court challenge.

Massive Cyberattack Hits as Many as 74 Countries

As many as 200,000 computers in 150 countries (not North America) were hit by a huge, fast-moving and global ransomware attack that locks computers and demands the digital equivalent of $300 ransom per computer, Kaspersky Lab, a Russian-based cybersecurity company, said Friday. The infections crippled more than a dozen hospitals in the United Kingdom, Spain’s largest telecom company and universities in Italy as well as some FedEx computers. Ransomware encrypts the files on a computer or network demanding that payment be made in Bitcoin or another untraceable digital currency before the criminals will unlock the files. Infected computers showed a screen giving the user three days to pay the ransom. After that, the price would be doubled. After seven days, the files would be deleted, it threatened. In Spain, the largest telecommunications company reportedly would have had to pay close to $550,000 to unlock all the encrypted computers hit on its network. “We have never seen such a fast spreading, well-coordinated attack with as many victims,” said Csaba Krasznay, director of the Cyber Security Academy at Hungary’s National University of Public Service. The National Health Service in the U.K. was repeatedly warned about its out-of-date and vulnerable systems before it suffered a devastating cyberattack on Friday, reports the New York Times.

Cyberattack Employed NSA Tools

The ransomware code is named WanaCrypt and has been in use by criminals since at least February. It is available in at least 28 languages, including Bulgarian and Vietnamese, according to Avast, a Czech security company that is following the fast-moving attack. A new variant dubbed WannaCry was created that makes use of a vulnerability in the Windows operating system that was patched by Microsoft on March 14. Computers that have not installed the patch are potentially vulnerable to the malicious code, according to a Kaspersky Lab blog post on Friday. The attack began with a simple phishing email, similar to the one Russian hackers used in the attacks on the Democratic National Committee and other targets last year. The virus then quickly spread through victims’ systems using a hacking method that the N.S.A. is believed to have developed as part of its arsenal of cyberweapons. The connection to the N.S.A. was particularly chilling. Starting last summer, a group calling itself the “Shadow Brokers” began to post software tools that came from the United States government’s stockpile of hacking weapons, the first time a cyberweapon developed by the N.S.A., funded by American taxpayers and stolen by an adversary had been unleashed by cybercriminals.

Ban on Laptops, Tablets on Trans-Atlantic Flights Appears Inevitable

A U.S. ban on laptops and tablets in cabins of trans-Atlantic flights to the United States appeared all but inevitable Friday after Department of Homeland Security officials briefed European governments on a proposal that would affect millions of passengers. The move, which would impact routes that carry as many as 65 million people a year on over 400 daily flights, would expand a ban already in place for planes flying out of eight Middle East and African countries. The restriction was introduced in March over fears that bombs or explosive materials could be concealed on electronic devices brought onboard. Cellphones would still be allowed in cabins but virtually every other electronic device would not be permitted and would need to be stowed in checked bags. One issue that has become a focus for security officials is how to make sure that lithium batteries used in laptops aren’t turned into bombs that can be detonated mid-air even if stored in luggage holds. Two airline officials briefed on the discussions said DHS gave no timetable for an announcement, but they were resigned to its inevitability.

Trump Appoints Voter-ID Champion to Panel Probing Fraud

Fulfilling yet another campaign promise, President Trump signed an executive order Thursday creating a Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity headed by Vice President Mike Pence that will review and report on “systems and practices” that could be used for “fraudulent voting.” Significantly, Trump has appointed Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has led the implementation of some of the nation’s strictest voting laws, as vice chairman of the panel. Kobach championed his state’s controversial proof of citizenship law, which requires voters to provide a birth certificate or passport to register. The issue of voter fraud long has divided the nation, with Democrats insisting it doesn’t exist on a scale that would impact election outcomes. Democrats, at the same time, have opposed voter ID laws and other preventative measures, asserting they discriminate against minority voters. The problem is that amid many individual reports of voter fraud, there are no reliable figures as yet to prove it exists on a meaningful scale.

Supreme Court Rejects Appeal to Reinstate NC Voter ID Law

The Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal to reinstate North Carolina’s voter identification law, which a lower court said targeted African-Americans “with almost surgical precision.” The justices left in place the lower court ruling striking down the law’s photo ID requirement and reduction in early voting. The situation was complicated when Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and Attorney General Josh Stein tried to withdraw the appeal, which was first filed when Republican Pat McCrory was governor. The dispute is similar to the court fight over Texas’ voter ID law, also struck down as racially discriminatory. Voters, civil rights groups and the Obama administration quickly filed lawsuits challenging the new laws. The Trump administration already has dropped its objections to the Texas law. Shortly before Trump took office in January, the Justice Department urged the Supreme Court to reject the North Carolina appeal.

ICE Arrests 1300 in Anti-Gang Operation

Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced its largest anti-gang operation ever on Thursday, a six-week program that netted more than 1,300 arrests nationwide. Though the effort was led by ICE, the focus was not exclusively on immigrants. Of the arrests, 933 were US citizens and 445 were foreign nationals, with 384 in the country illegally. Of the 1,378 total arrests, 1,095 were confirmed to be gang members or affiliates of a gang, ICE said, including mostly Bloods, followed by Sureños, MS-13 and the Crips. MS-13 has been an increasing focus of the Trump administration as part of its border security and immigration enforcement efforts. The arrests mostly took place in the Houston, New York, Atlanta and Newark, New Jersey, areas.

Enraged Californians Rebel Against Tax Hike on Cars and Gas

In California, a state known for its love of driving, high-priced gasoline and history of tax revolts, a rebellion is brewing against Gov. Jerry Brown’s massive gas-and-car tax increase. In the two weeks since the Democrat signed Senate Bill 1, opponents have launched an initiative drive to repeal the $52.4 billion transportation package. Gas is already expensive in California — the state vies with Hawaii for the nation’s highest per-gallon prices — and SB1 will make it more so by dinging motorists with a 12-cent-per-gallon excise tax hike on gasoline, a 20-cent increase on diesel and higher vehicle registration fees in order to fill potholes, repair roads and bridges, and expand mass transit. “The voters are enraged,” said Assemblyman Travis Allen, the Orange County Republican behind the repeal initiative. What has Mr. Allen fuming is that lawmakers pushed through the largest fuel tax hike in state history without bringing it before the voters.

Union’s Paywatch Report Ignores High Salaries of Union Bosses

A powerful labor union’s new report slams the pay gap between CEOs and rank-and-file workers, but critics say it conveniently ignores the sky-high salaries union bosses pull down. The group’s annual Executive Paywatch report unveiled this week, found that last year the average S&P 500 CEO earned a total of $13.1 million in compensation, while the average U.S. worker made only $37,632, a pay ratio of 347:1. But not included in any of the figures are the total compensations of nearly 192 union presidents who earned more than the average executive’s income. An audit of past Paywatch reports by the American Enterprise Institute found that the AFL-CIO’s conclusion of the disparaging CEO-to-worker pay ratio is faulty and misleading, saying that the actual average U.S. chief executive earns $194,350. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that there are actually 246,240 ‘chief executives’ in the U.S. who earned an average annual salary of $180,700 in 2014.

More Price Hikes Likely for Obamacare Insurance Markets

Early moves by insurers suggest that another round of price hikes and limited choices will greet insurance shoppers around the country when they start searching for next year’s coverage on the public markets established by the Affordable Care Act, reports Newsmax. Regulators in Virginia and Maryland have reported early price hike requests ranging from just under 10 percent to more than 50 percent. Increases like that will probably will be seen in other states, too. Prices for this type of insurance are already being affected by evaporating competition. With the latest departures, more than 40 percent of U.S. counties would have only one insurer selling coverage on their marketplaces for next year, according to data compiled by The Associated Press. Competition for customers was supposed to keep prices low. But insurers faced big losses in some markets, and they got less financial support from the government than they expected. They’ve been raising prices and pulling out of some markets altogether in response.

Economic News

With the low unemployment rate giving workers more leverage than they’ve had in years, a surprisingly large number are either job hopping or on the lookout for new opportunities. About 27% of employees switched jobs in the 12 months ending in the first quarter. Three years ago, about 23% of workers left one job for another during the prior year. Nearly half of all leisure and hospitality workers and one-third of those in professional and business services changed jobs the past year. Not surprisingly, job hoppers are snaring bigger pay increases than their more loyal colleagues. In the first quarter, switchers who worked full-time realized average annual earnings gains of 5.2%, compared with 4.3% for full-time job holders.

For years, the nation’s solid job growth and tumbling unemployment have been tainted by the shadow of millions of underemployed (i.e. part-time) Americans not counted in the official jobless rate. However, the number of part-time workers who would prefer full-time jobs fell by 281,000 last month to 5.3 million, down from a peak of 9.2 million in 2010 and the lowest number in nine years, according to the Labor Department. Altogether, the broadest measure of U.S. joblessness that includes part-timers, discouraged workers who have stopped looking as well as unemployed people is now at 8.6%, compared with 9.7% a year ago and a high of 16.9% in 2010. It’s slightly above the pre-recession mark of 8.4%.

The United States and China have agreed to take action by mid-July to increase access for U.S. financial firms and expand trade in beef and chicken among other steps as part of Washington’s drive to cut its trade deficit with Beijing, Reuters reported. The deals are the first results of 100 days of trade talks that began last month, when a meeting between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping proved far more friendly than had been expected after last year’s U.S. presidential campaign. “China trade, huge. Because the president has basically changed his campaign position,” the Newsmax Finance Insider said. The United States ran a trade deficit of $347 billion with China last year, U.S. Treasury figures show.

North Korea

North Korea’s latest launch of a ballistic missile Sunday drew strong criticism from the United States and other nations. This time, the missile landed closer to Russia than to Japan. The White House issued a statement late Saturday saying that North Korea has been “a flagrant menace for too long,” and that the latest “provocation” should serve as a call for all nations to implement stronger sanctions against the North. A spokesman for China’s foreign ministry, Hua Chunying, called the situation on the Korean peninsula “complex and sensitive” and that countries “should not do things that further escalate tensions in the region.” South Korean President Moon called the launch a “clear” violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions and a “serious challenge” to international peace and security. U.S. officials are closely “monitoring” the aftermath of the latest North Korean missile test after the rogue regime claimed that its newest rocket was capable of carrying a nuclear warhead – and that its arsenal could reach American shores. North Korea’s Hwasong-12 missile reached an altitude of 2,111.5 kilometers (1,312 miles) and flew 787 kilometers (489 miles), according to state news agency KCNA. Analysts estimated its ranged as 4,500 kilometers which would put the US territory of Guam within its reach.

Russia

A Russian military jet “came within approximately 20 feet” of a US Navy P-8A Poseidon surveillance plane while it was flying in international airspace over the Black Sea earlier last week. A U.S. defense official told CNN that the Russian aircraft was armed with six air-to-air missiles and that the pilot took photos of the U.S. plane during the encounter. Russia has conducted several flights off the US coast in recent months. Last week, two Russian bombers, flanked by a pair of fighter jets, were intercepted by stealth U.S. F-22 aircraft off the coast of Alaska. And during a stretch in April, Russian military aircraft were spotted flying off the coast of Alaska four times in as many days. The fact that Tuesday’s encounter took place near Crimea adds an additional level of significance, as the two countries’ opposing views on the conflict in Ukraine have become a hot-button issue between the sides. The US, meanwhile, has positioned military assets across Europe in an effort to reassure its European and NATO allies in the wake of Russia’s movements in Ukraine.

Syria

Monitors say Kurdish-led Syrian forces, backed by a U.S.-led air coalition, are battling Islamic State extremists on the northern outskirts of Raqqa, the IS de facto capital seized by the militant group three years ago. The activist Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Saturday that the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) advanced within four kilometers of Raqqa as fighting raged at several points north and east of the besieged city. An SDF spokesman, speaking Friday, said an anti-jihadist assault on the fortified northern city would most likely begin in the next several months.

Venezuela

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has fired Health Minister Antonieta Caporale days after the government’s first release of health data in two years showed soaring infant and maternal mortality rates. The firing came after the health ministry recently released new data showing infant and maternal deaths and cases of malaria are skyrocketing in the country already grappling with severe medical shortages. Caporale had been on the job since January. The data from her office showed that confirmed malaria cases in 2016 stood at 240,000, a 76% increase over the previous year. Maternal — or pregnancy-related — deaths rose 66%, to 756. Last year, 11,466 infants died, a 30% increase. The new health minister, Luis Lopez, has been the deputy minister of hospitals for the national government and secretary of health for the Venezuelan state of Aragua.

France

Politicians, journalists and her own daughter have stepped forward in defense of Brigitte Trogneux, wife of French President-elect Emmanuel Macron, in response to a series of sexist and misogynistic slurs against her. Many of the unwelcome comments have focused on the fact that Trogneux — age 64 with seven grandchildren — is 24 years her husband’s senior. She famously went from being Macron’s teacher to his partner, and eventually his wife. Now she is France’s first lady. U.S. President Donald Trump is 24 years older than Melania Trump, but few people are making a fuss about their age gap.

Earthquakes

Last week, within the span of 24 hours, 45 earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 or greater struck Alaska. Twenyt-five of them were of magnitude 4.0 or greater. The worst one had a magnitude of 6.2, but none of the earthquakes did much damage because none of them hit heavily populated areas. But the reason why all this shaking is causing so much concern is because the “Ring of Fire” runs right along the southern Alaska coastline, and all of the earthquakes except for one were along the southern coast. After running along the southern Alaska coastline, the Ring of Fire goes south along the west coast of Canada, the United States and Mexico. What affects one part of a fault network will often trigger something along another portion of the same fault network, and so many living on the West coast are watching the shaking in Alaska with deep concern. For a long time scientists have acknowledged that a major Cascadia subduction zone earthquake is way overdue, and when one finally strikes the devastation that we could see in the Pacific Northwest is likely to be off the charts. In fact, some scientists believe that the coming Cascadia subduction zone earthquake could potentially be as high as magnitude 9.0, reports Charisma News.

Weather

A confirmed EF1 tornado was reported in the Sherwood Forrest area near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Friday morning, which tossed cars into the air like toys and injured at least one person. The National Weather Service said the tornado that remained on the ground for a half-mile packed winds as high as 90 mph and was 30 yards wide. One person was transported to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after the truck in which they were driving was flipped by the strong winds. Several other vehicles were tossed about, some structures may have been damaged and nearly 2,600 residents in the area were without power. A man was killed and several people injured in Passaic, New Jersey, on Sunday when strong, fast-moving thunderstorms rolled through the New York metropolitan area.

An active week is ahead as multiple rounds of severe thunderstorms, including tornadoes, threaten the central states. Some of the storms may also produce heavy rain, leading to localized areas of flash flooding. The severe weather setup this week involves a strong jet stream dip – or upper-level trough – over the Rockies, with two separate disturbances riding along that trough and punching into the Plains states. At least two rounds of severe storms are anticipated. Snow will blanket much of the mountain West the next several days, adding to a still-impressive mid-May snowpack from a winter that was the wettest on record for some areas.

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